Poor oral health affects a large portion of adults in the United States. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that one of every two American adults who have reached the age of 30 or over has periodontal disease, and heart disease, though less prevalent than gum disease, is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Could the two diseases be related? Research shows they likely are, and there is no better time to learn about the connection than during American Heart Month.

The Link Between Oral and Heart Health

While it is hard to prove that periodontal disease contributes to the development of heart disease in Leesburg, VA residents, there is ample evidence that a link does exist between the two conditions. If you notice any of these symptoms of gum disease, it’s time to boost your oral care for the sake of your heart and overall physical health:

·         Bleeding gums, especially while brushing or flossing

·         Chronic foul breath

·         One or more loose teeth

·         Receding gums

·         Lost teeth

If oral inflammation is not treated promptly, it could lead to inflammation in other areas of the body. Studies show that when bacteria found in periodontal disease are removed from the gums, levels of the same bacteria are diminished in the heart.

How You Can Take Care of Your Heart and Oral Health

Some doctors suggest that the same factors that put you at risk of developing gum disease also put you at risk of developing heart disease. In order to reduce your risk of either condition, it is recommend that you:

·         Quit smoking

·         Stay active

·         Eat a healthy diet

·         Take care of your oral health

·         Control your blood pressure and weight

Keep your mouth and body healthy, and you’ll reduce your chance of developing many types of diseases.

Call Us

In addition to following a strict oral hygiene regimen, you can also boost your oral health—and possibly your heart health—by receiving regular dental care. Schedule your appointment with Dr. Jean-Claude Kharmouche by calling our practice during American Heart Month.